25+ Noteworthy Tools For Web Design

25+ Noteworthy Tools For Web Design

DESIGN TOOLS

Macaw Scarlet

First on the list is Macaw Scarlet, a tool mae by the guys who brought us the original Macaw.

Billing itself as a “live design environment”, Macaw Scarlet is geared toward making responsive web design easier for everyone.

scarlet

Wagtail

Wagtail is not a design tool, it’s a CMS. And yet, it could easily be included in the design work-flow, especially where content design is concerned.

You see, it has a fantastic feature called Streamfield, which works a lot like Medium’s post editor. The difference is that it’s customizable, and thus more powerful. This makes it a lot easier for the user to design content on each page.

wagtail

Magic Mirror for Sketch 3

Heres one for the Sketch users. Basically, it makes a sort of smart object designed to help you put mockups into stock photos.

magic-mirror

WIRE-FRAMING TOOLS

Wire Flow

This one gets my personal stamp of approval. It runs fast on my normally not-drawing-friendly tablet, and comes with just about everything you could ever want from a wire-framing app.

It’s also designed to work with phone-sized devices, which could be a great way to properly visualize a phone app interface.

wireflow

Apple Watch wire-frame kit

Wireframe UI elements for the Apple Watch! What more do you need to know?

apple_watch_wireframe

PowerMockup

There has been more than one wireframe toolkit for Apple’s Keynote software. It was only a matter of time before someone made it happen for Powerpoint. And they have. Here it is.

power-mockup

PROTOTYPING TOOLS

Origami

Coming all the way from Facebook itself: “Origami is a free tool for designing modern user interfaces. Quickly put together a prototype, run it on your iPhone or iPad, iterate on it, and export code snippets your engineers can use.”

No word yet on how useful those code snippets actually are. But it’s Facebook. They have good engineers.

origami

Marvel

With simple tools, and a solid free plan, Marvel makes a great prototyping app. It integrates with Dropbox and Google Drive, importing any images you specify, and allowing you to link them together in a quick mock-up of an app.

It keeps your imported images synced, too. If you save new versions to Dropbox or Google Drive, your prototype app automatically gets updated.

marvel

Protosketch

Protosketch is a prototyping app (kind of) designed for the iPad. It comes with a UI kit (including tons of components), basic vector tools, alignment tools, and a lot more.

It’s currently in beta, and it’s only for the iPad, but if that’s your platform, this could be perfect for you. It plays nice with other apps, too: it can export your files in raster formats, SVG, and PDF.

protosketch

Frontify

Like many other tools on this list, Frontify does prototyping. It also offers tools to make working on branding and style guides as a group easier. Create your color palette, define your style, and create a library of UI elements, and share it with the rest of your team.

frontify

Atomic

Use Atomic to pull in your files from Photoshop or Sketch and make prototypes from them. Version control, collaboration features, and more make this an excellent tool for slick, fast, iterative design.

atomic

Form

Form is an advanced prototype creator that works in tandem with your iPhone. Create the prototype in your desktop or laptop, and see the results immediately on your phone. Plus, it uses Google’s Material Design principles to make your prototype look great.

form

Pixate

Pixate specializes in high-fidelity “native” prototypes that are displayed on your phone and work a lot like the real thing.

pixate

WEB BUILDERS

Sandvox

Sandvox is a Mac app for the non-coders among us. It’s largely template-based (as is an ever-increasing portion of the Internet), but does make provisons for more advanced users to add stuff in manually.

It doubles as a sort of CMS for some kinds of sites, like blogs, and though the software isn’t “new”, recent versions have introduced Sandvox Hosting. The hand-coders among us might recoil at the idea, but for newbies, the package deal is actually pretty great.

It does work with any host, though, so if you want to handle that yourself, you can.

sandvox

XPRS

A site builder for beginners, XPRS offers free sites for personal use, for artists and students. There are pro plans for business and e-commerce.

xprs

WORDPRESS BUILDERS

Themify Flow

WordPress may have its detractors, but others are taking it in surprising new directions. The guys over at Themify, for example, decided that it was time to create a design tool on top of the publishing platform.

The result is Themify Flow which allows you to create custom, responsive WordPress themes from a drag-n-drop interface. Best of all, it’s free and open source.

themifyflow

Cornerstone

Cornerstone is sort of competing with Themify Flow, in that it offers a visual way to create WordPress themes, right on top of WordPress itself.

It operates differenly, however. For example, it features a live code editor, and other features design to give developer-level access to the front-end design. Also, it’s not free, unless you buy the X Theme.

cornerstone

Qards

Quards is another page builder plugin for WordPress. Most of the design work is done for you, but instead of choosing a single template, you build each page with “cards”.

These are basically pre-made layout sections which can be mixed and matched to build a whole page. It’s good for landing pages, arranging individual articles in new and original ways, promo sites, and those sorts of things.

qards

COLLABORATION & PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS

Relay

A quick and easy tool for Slack users who need to share their design work a lot. With extensions/apps for Adobe CC, Sketch, Chrome, and OSX, it simplifies sharing whatever you’re working on.

relay

Skala Preview

Want to see previews of whatever you’re working on in Photoshop or Android? Just installSkala Preview, and you’ll be able to send lossless, color-perfect previews to just about any mobile device.

It comes with the option to plug the device into your computer via USB instead of using wi-fi.

skala_preview

RightFont

RightFont is a fast, pretty font manager for Mac that integrates with Adobe CC and Sketch.

right_font

FRESH CODE

jQuery 3

The jQuery 3 alpha has been released. There aren’t any new features to speak of, but there have been extensive re-writes of old features, bug fixes, and performance improvements.

jquery

Simpler Sidebar

Speaking of jQuery, there are a number of new plugins out that could make a designer’s job a lot easier, especially if you’re a designer who also codes a bit.

We start with Simpler Sidebar, which makes sidebars. It’s small, it’s fast, it’s pretty. Just don’t use a hamburger menu to trigger it, I guess.

simpler-sidebar

Labelauty

Label your radio buttons and check boxes in style. Great for the designer who just can’t let browsers do things their own way.

labelauty

smart-placeholder

When filling out forms, I occasionally click on a field, get distracted by something, and then come back to it. If that field was labeled with a placeholder attribute, I sometimes have to un-select it to remember what I’m supposed to be typing.

Silly, but human.

smartplaceholder solves that design issue by keeping the placeholder visible below the text being typed. Neat, right?

smart-placeholder

REFRESHED TOOLS

We’d be remiss if we didn’t call attention to the great work being done on already well-known apps. Here are the ones that have had some noteworthy updates recently:

Webflow

Webflow has been integrating thirdparty services into its functionality (much like the rest of the Internet) in some new ways. As of now, you can add functionality to your web forms right from Webflow.

You can add e-mails to Mailchimp lists, send out tweets, add data to Google spreadsheets, or make a new note with Evernote. You can also, incidentally, have your form send an e-mail.

webflow

InVision

InVision has been introducing new features steadily, including free, unlimited mobile user testing, a workflow manager, Dribbble integration, and emoji. Yes, emoji.

invision

Strikingly

In recent months, Strikingly has introduced a new page editor, collaboration, and it even added an RSS feed for its blog functionality… Better late than never.

strikingly
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How to Obtain Website Content from Clients

How to Obtain Website Content from Clients

Content from Clients

In a perfect world, we’d all have all the content we needed before we ever touched a wireframe, on paper or otherwise. The hate for lorem ipsum is real, and I do understand why, but it’s a simple fact that we do not live in a perfect world. Clients are often ready to hand over a down payment, but not actually ready to build the site yet.

If you find yourself in this situation (and it will happen a lot at the beginning of your career), you’ll need to help your client get ready. And if they don’t hire a copy writer, you’ll need to help them write the content themselves.

Note: Even though this guide is directed towards web design, the experiences and principles can be applied to virtually any project (in any industry) that involves procuring content from a client.

Give Them Constraints

If your client is writing their own content, they may need to be told what to write. Most people are not writers by nature. It’s a skill that can be learned by virtually anyone with varying levels of success, but it takes some persistence and associated time. Most people, when told to write some content for a website, are probably going to stare at the blank screen for a while.

Hesitantly they might begin to pluck out letters on their keyboard, one by one. It’ll probably be a laborious process, but they’ll have that first grand sentence: “Hi! Welcome to the home page of our website.” And then they might write a bunch of stuff that would probably be better suited for another page.

People have long made the argument that total creative freedom doesn’t make for good design; constraints do. Constraints force us to solve problems, but they also give us direction, and purpose. Yes, it means doing some of their website planning and strategy for them, but no one said you had to do it for free.

Go Through The Process With Them Before They Write

Even instructions like, “Okay, you need a paragraph of introductory text for the home page.” might be a bit vague for people unfamiliar with writing website copy. Get on Skype, or even meet them in person to take your client through the plan you have for their website (wireframes or other prototypes may come in handy here).

Also be sure to tell them how much content is intended for each page, page section, or UI element. If only a sentence or two will reasonably fit, make sure they know this. If they can go nuts on the “About Us” page, make sure they know that, too.

And yes, giving them a space to go nuts is probably a good idea. Everyone wants unleash their inner Hemingway, and if the “About” page ends up being as long and annoying as The Old Man and the Sea, that’s the price we pay for good relationships with our clients.

As you go through your instructions, write them down, and send them to your client via email for reference. This way, they’ll always know what the plan is.

Charge by the hour for this bit, at least.

Go Ahead And Annoy Them A Bit

Ever had a client give you a deadline, then disappear? You have no obligation to take that lying down. Now, they might be busy, and have other legitimate priorities. If they tell you a family member is sick, just work for another client for a while.

But if they just disappear on you, don’t be afraid to remind them once in a while. They might genuinely forget, and need the reminder. Even if they haven’t forgotten, they might need a little motivation. And yes, you might annoy them a bit, but clients should respect your time, too.

If they can’t finish even one project, there probably isn’t a long-term relationship on the table

Now don’t e-mail them every day. That’s excessive. An e-mail per week should be fine to start with, and you can always increase that number as deadlines approach. If they e-mail you back with something like, “Thanks, I’m working on it!”, or, “For god’s sake please stop, I’m working on it!”… you can safely stop sending them e-mails for a while.

Don’t worry too much about annoying them. If they can’t finish even one project, there probably isn’t a long-term relationship on the table.

Use Software To Make It All A Bit Easier

Of course, this is all a fair bit of work. You can automate the process of getting content from your clients just a little bit, though. If you’ve got the budget for one more darned SAAS product in your pipeline, you could try out Content Snare.

You literally just set up forms that specifically request the content you need. You can put in character limits, and basically define the information required with various kinds of inputs. You want constraints? They’ve got constraints, and automatic email reminders.

Now the downside to this software is the cost. At the time of this writing, the cheapest plan is $24US per month (billed yearly). It’s affordable, probably, for a designer with plenty of clients already. But when every dollar counts, this is one tool you can probably do without.

For anyone who’s a little cash-strapped, you can replicate the basic functionality for requesting content with a much simpler tool like Google Forms. Just make one for each page, and go. You can embed these forms, too, so if you already have something like a “client area” set up on your website, you could theoretically set each client up with their own set of forms to fill out, all in one place.

Automated reminder emails? Well, there’s no shortage of mass mailing applications out there. If you’re already using one, you could schedule some reminders pretty easily. Just be sure to turn them off once you’ve gotten a response.

Annoying them is one thing. Using robots to do it is another.

Provide Some Examples from Relevant Sources

A simple and effective way to get a client to understand fully what you want them to provide is to give them pertinent and specific examples of the needed content. For example if the client’s project is a construction website that specifically needs some text content for the Services page you could send them a url of a well established construction website’s a Service’s page and inform them to create something similar. It really can be that easy. Of course this method could be replicated throughout the site as needed.

Offboard Web Design Project in 5 Steps: How to Guide

Offboard Web Design Project in 5 Steps: How to Guide

Offboard Web Design Project – 5 Steps

As you draw closer to the finish line with a website, does your client see it just as clearly as you do? Or are they still wavering on design and copy choices even while you’re in the final stages of QA, or talking about additional features they’ll want to add to the site “some day”? It’s time to offboard web design project.

Unless you are getting paid — and paid well — for every single hour you put into a website, you have to be willing to enforce a final stopping point. If you don’t, your client will undoubtedly play the “What about this? Or this?” game for as long as you allow them to.

And you can’t afford to do that. You have other clients whose websites deserve your attention.

Just as you have created an onboarding process to smoothly kick off a new website project, you must do the same with an offboarding process.

Step 1: Collect Your Final Payment

Once the client has given you the approval on the finished website, you push it live. After some light testing to confirm that all is well on the live domain, it’s time to initiate the offboarding process.

You’ll do this by sending along the last invoice. Better yet, your invoicing software should automatically be configured to do this upon reaching the final project milestone.

One my favorite tools to do this with is AND CO.

AND CO

That’s because you can do everything in here:

  • Create a proposal;
  • Send the contract;
  • Track your time;
  • Send invoices.

Because each of these elements exist within the same place, setting up and scheduling invoices based on your project’s milestones (including the launch date) is really easy to do.

Don’t move on to the next steps until you collect the payment due though. Letting a client go any more than seven days after the project’s end without final payment simply invites them to ask you to do more work.

Step 2: Send the Wrap-up Email

Upon confirming receipt of payment, send your client a wrap-up email.

This doesn’t have to be lengthy. The goal is to get them to schedule the closing call as soon as possible. Something like this should work:

Greetings, [client name]!
I wanted to thank you for the opportunity to build this website for [company name]. I hope you’re just as pleased with it as I am!
I know you’re excited to put this website to work for you now that you have it, but I have just a few things I want to show you as we wrap up.
When you have a moment, please go to my Calendly and schedule a 15-minute Wrap-Up Session for some time this week. 
During this call, I’ll give you a behind-the-scenes tour of your website and show you how to edit your content. Afterwards, I will send along the login credentials you need to manage your website along with all of your design assets.
Talk soon.

As I mentioned in the message above, Calendly is the tool I use to simplify my scheduling with clients.

Calendly

All you have to do is create an event (like “Client Offboarding” or “Client Onboarding”), set up your availability, and then send the link to your clients to pick a time when you’re free. It makes life so much easier.

Step 3: Do the Wrap-Up Video Call

This final call with your client needs to be done over video or, at the very least, a screen-share. For this, I’d suggest using Zoom.

Zoom

The above example is how I used to do my offboarding calls with WordPress clients.

I’d log into their website and then give them an orientation of all of the key areas they needed to know. I’d show them how to create a post, how to create a page, and explain the difference between the two. I’d also show them important areas like the Media folder, the area to manage Users, and maybe a few other things.

This “training” call is yours to do with as you like. Just make sure the client walks away feeling confident in taking the reins over from you.

Step 4: Deliver the Remaining Pieces

The website is done, you’ve collected the payment, and you’ve had the final call with your client. Now, it’s time to deliver the remaining pieces you owe them.

Logins – If you created any accounts from-scratch (e.g. WordPress, web hosting, social media, etc.), send along the login credentials.

Style guide – Did you create a style guide for the client? Package it up in a professional-looking PDF and send it over in case they decide to work with another designer in the future.

Design assets – Again, on the off chance they work with someone else, you’ll want to send along the design assets you created in their native formats.

Licenses – You may have licensed certain assets during this project, like stock photos or design templates. If that’s the case, you’ll need to bill them for the licenses (if you haven’t already) and transfer ownership to them now.

While you could send these along before the wrap-up call, you run the risk of the clients taking the materials and running away… Only to show up months later wanting to know what all this stuff is, what they’re supposed to do with it, and wondering if you’ll have time to walk them through the website now.

Or they don’t open any of it and then message you months down the line, urgently demanding access to their site, files, etc. To avoid this from happening, clearly label everything and send it along in a shared Dropbox folder.

Dropbox

Even if they lose the link to the Dropbox folder at any point, you don’t have to repackage up all their stuff again. You can simply grab the link from your end and resend.

Step 5: Follow Up in 60 Days

Set a reminder in your project management template to follow up with website clients 60 days after the wrap-up. This will give them enough time to sit with the website and either:

  • Become really comfortable using it;
  • Realize it’s too much work.

Either way, it’s a good idea to check in.

If they’re taking good care of the website and using it to promote their business, that’s great. This email will simply serve as a reminder that you remain their trusted ally and you’re here if they ever need anything.

And if they’re not taking care of it, this is an excellent opportunity to offer your assistance in providing (paid) support and maintenance.

Bringing Projects to a Close with an Offboarding Process

If you’ve done a good job of setting expectations with your client from the start, bringing a project to a close should be no problem.

Then again, you know how clients can get. They’re so excited to actually have a website now that they can’t stop imagining the possibilities. So long as you’ve delivered what they paid for, though, you are under no obligation to keep this project open to entertain those ideas unless they start a new contract with you.

Use this offboarding checklist to ensure you give each of your web design projects as strong and final a close as possible.

Combine the Power of Data and Design to Maximize Results For Your Website

Combine the Power of Data and Design to Maximize Results For Your Website

In today’s digital era, having an impactful and compelling website is a critical component for any business or organization. A useful site that connects with your audience instills trust, screams authority, and drives action, can mean the difference between remaining relevant and competitive or falling silently to the wayside.

Despite the critical importance of websites in today’s competitive landscape, many web designers find their creations falling short on the performance matrix, under-delivering on KPIs and leaving those in charge scratching their heads for an answer.

Simply put, sometimes innovative layouts and stunning visuals aren’t enough. Lack of data in the design process can create a disconnect between what “works” and what looks or feels appealing.

The marriage of data and design makes for a compelling approach to data-driven design processes and can act as a guiding force for strategizing and implementing site architecture and design elements that not only look great but meet or exceed performance expectations.

Market Research – Where it all Begins

In life, as in business (and web design), having a clear direction and goal in mind from the outset will make for a predictable journey to that end.

If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable

~ Seneca

Market research is all about understanding your audience, analyzing the competition and competitive landscape, and looking introspectively inward to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

MARKET DEMANDS

Your “market” represents the gameboard, along with all of its components and pieces upon which your design strategy executes. As it relates to market demands, what elements are vital, required or expected of your design and website?

Examples:

  • Visible accreditations or licensure;
  • Prominent reviews and ratings;
  • Specific contact or support channels;
  • Information such as guides or training materials;
  • Product/service visuals or demonstrations;
  • Transparent pricing.

Market demands vary and will be particular to your specific industry, geographic location, and other factors.

COMPETITION / COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE

You know what they say: Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. While you don’t need to become best friends with the competition, monitoring their activities, strategies, updates, offerings and other prerogatives can provide you with insightful and useful information.

Competitive data can be used to leverage the time, resources and hard work of other brands to identify those activities or strategies that either perform well or fail in the market.

By doing so, you can learn from costly mistakes, while benefiting from winning concepts already battle-tested in the market and proven to either work.

Further, understanding the competitive landscape in its totality will help you understand what you’re up against, and can help you formulate ways to uniquely position your design in the market such that it stands out among the sea of competitors vying for the same business.

TARGET AUDIENCE / CUSTOMER AVATAR

Without a deep understanding of your target audience, any web designer is prone to missing the mark badly, failing to connect with, engage, inspire action, and meet the needs of their visitors.

Considerations with regards to your audience should include both demographic and user behavior data.

Demographic Data to Consider:

  • Gender
  • Age brackets
  • Income
  • Geographic locations
  • Family size
  • And other relevant data
  • Behavioral Data to Consider:
  • Needs and wants
  • Pain points or complaints
  • Issues/problems
  • Desired solutions
  • Likes and preferences
  • Purchase habits
  • And more…

The specific types of behavioral and demographic data that will be most useful and relevant to your design will be mostly dependent on your brand, vertical/niche, offerings, and other particulars.

PRODUCT / SOLUTIONS AUDIT

Sometimes it’s hard to see the forest for the trees as it were. Taking a step back and assessing your product/solutions and other offers can provide perspective on necessary design elements, positioning, and framing that can help turn a non-performing offer into a critical source of revenue.

Utilizing information uncovered in the previous steps, cross-reference your offers and take a hard look at whether or not your products or services meet market and user demands, needs and want.

In what way do your offers stand out (or in what ways can you make them stand out) from those offered by the competition. Utilize this data to formulation unique positioning and strategic approaches to incorporate your offers’ USP or value proposition.

Keyword Research

Keyword research is a vital component of the design process, and will largely dictate how information is architected, organized, presented and delivered on the site.

Approach keyword research from a bottom-up or top-down funnel approach.

Necessary components of keyword research include:

  • Keyword competition;
  • Keyword intent (buyer vs. research vs. informational, etc.);
  • Stage of funnel each keyword targets;
  • Organization of content for search engines and user experience;
  • Link modeling for internal link and ranking strategies.

Types of Content May Include:

  • Sales/landing pages;
  • Service/product pages;
  • Resources, guides, tutorials;
  • Informational and supportive blog posts or articles;
  • Information Architecture.

Information architecture is essential for user experience, search engine optimization, and conversion rate optimization. Utilizing data from the previous market and keyword research phases you can begin to optimally architect information in a way that is conducive to better performance.

ELEMENTS TO INCORPORATE INTO YOUR DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

Site Structure: Determined by both market and keyword research, your site’s structure can be first mapped out by using an organizational chart for ease of visualization.

URL Mapping: This step, while mostly administrative and somewhat tedious, involves the creation of each URL structure optimized for both readability by users and optimized for search engines to understand. Once created, assign designated keywords to their respective URLs.

Page Flows: An understanding of user behavior and the ideal buyer journey should also shape how information is structured and organized, helping both users and search engines to “flow” seamlessly through information in a way that answers their questions and solves their problems with the least amount of “friction.”

Value Propositions: An understanding of the problems and pain points facing your target audience will enable you to architect, draft and present unique value propositions tailored to each individualized problem or issue.

Topic Clustering: Once you’ve mapped out your keywords, pages, and content, group or “cluster” those topics that are semantically relevant to each other. Clustering your content can help with search engine categorization and relevancy metrics.

Interlinking: Once mapped out with pages and content clustered, seek out opportunities to link between related pages.

Closing Thoughts

Tailoring design to user needs and expectations is never far from any designer’s thought process, yet knowing exactly which strategies or tactics have the best chance of performing well is often unclear. By utilizing a data-driven decision-making process, web designers can leverage information in a way that helps them formulate a plan tailor-made to perform and exceed expectations. Designs using data versus personal opinion, experience improved levels of engagement, higher conversions, enhanced user experience and overall performance.

As a professional web designer, you have a responsibility to both the users, and to the organization for which you are working, to use and implement all available tools to deliver the best end product possible. Data is one of those tools and one in which there is an excellent potential for success when used correctly.

references: canva, webdesignerdepot, klipfolio

5 Trends for Web Design in 2020

5 Trends for Web Design in 2020

The web industry is constantly changing. Here are the trends to watch out for in 2020.

Predicting web design trends is always tricky. Get it right and you are praised for being ahead of the curve; get it wrong and you are met with a flood of I-told-you-sos. That said, with 2019 now in full force, I’m going to provide some insight into the trends that will define web design throughout this year and beyond.

We’ve seen some vast changes in the past decade: the HTML5 revolution, mobile-first app development and now native features in web apps, plus more new web design tools than you could imagine. With the increasing use of machine learning, cross-platform frameworks and a more diverse developer base building everything, there’s going to be some exciting changes in our industry. These are my continuing predictions for the biggest web design trends in 2019.

1. AI gets personal

Artificial intelligence is too hot to not bring up. While it might not be as flashy as a self-driving car, the web can certainly connect to AI. Machine learning is going to take analytics to the next level. In the past, analytics offered more of a reactive approach: log the data and then use it for your next release. 2019 and onwards should continue to be about capturing data about how your app is used and improving the user experience by driving the website to change and adapt to this by itself. 

This means that, depending on the data available on a user, the application will be able to act like a chameleon and change itself to provide the ideal UX for them. This will create truly personalized sites that behave differently and show different features depending on the individual using it.

2. Voice interfaces take over

With the explosion of voice assistants such as Alexa and Siri, conversational interfaces are bound to become a natural part of an application’s fabric. As more users become accustomed to interacting with the web using their voice, developers will need to ensure they can offer a seamless experience, even in web applications. Imagine having users sit on their couch and view their social media feed or tell their favourite voice assistant to pull up and read a news article for them – all without traditional inputs.

3. Accessibility becomes a requirement

Accessibility is no longer a luxury; it should be an absolute requirement. We’re seeing this pop up more and more, and this trend will just continue next year. Some have pushed hard with Progress Kendo UI to follow common accessibility guidelines like WCAG 2.1 and WAI-ARIA, to ensure web components follow accessibility requirements out of the box.

This positive trend in accessibility focus will continue in the web. Whether this comes from development practices naturally emphasising accessibility, or governments and legislature stepping in to enforce adherence, we will have more accessible applications.

4. Web apps get an AR makeover

Augmented reality will take the web by storm in 2019. AR is already commonplace in scenarios like Snapchat filters or Pokémon Go, but its use of AR will only expand to cover not only social media and games, but also everyday applications. 

The beauty of AR is that it does not require full immersion via a clunky headset, as with VR. Instead, it can be used with the phones that we walk around with in our pockets today. Why should AR be limited to just the native mobile applications on a device? Why not use it on the web? Offering AR services through your web application without needing it to be installed as a native app can have huge benefits from a UX perspective. 

Imagine being in a grocery store and doing a quick web search for a recipe. AR integration could provide users with turn-by-turn navigation through their mobile device to find all the ingredients within that store – all within a web app.

5. Developers flock to the web

In the past, everyone stuck to their favored programming language. Then along came HTML5 and JavaScript went from being the language only for web to almost a universal programming language.

Of course, JavaScript has its own set of choices. While I cannot predict the rise and fall of JavaScript frameworks, I believe that once the dust settles, developers will realise that the basic concepts of these frameworks are completely transferable. This shifts the focus to better programming habits and architecture of web applications, rather than being akin to picking your favorite flavor of ice cream.

Frameworks such as NativeScript and React Native will also play a big part in bringing more developers to web technologies, since they provide a single codebase for web and native mobile applications. 

Additionally, concepts like progressive web applications (PWAs) will continue to blur the line between native mobile apps and web. Developers will then be able to purely focus on the user experience without worrying about specific platform choices.

Web Assembly is another technology that is bringing more developers to the web. Thanks to Web Assembly, C++, C#, Rust and other programming languages can now target the web. Projects like Blazor, which leverages .NET in the web, take advantage of the promise of Web Assembly and will help open the web to even more languages. This means that in the future, all developers can be web developers, regardless of programming language.

references: creativebloq