25+ Noteworthy Tools For Web Design

25+ Noteworthy Tools For Web Design

DESIGN TOOLS

Macaw Scarlet

First on the list is Macaw Scarlet, a tool mae by the guys who brought us the original Macaw.

Billing itself as a “live design environment”, Macaw Scarlet is geared toward making responsive web design easier for everyone.

scarlet

Wagtail

Wagtail is not a design tool, it’s a CMS. And yet, it could easily be included in the design work-flow, especially where content design is concerned.

You see, it has a fantastic feature called Streamfield, which works a lot like Medium’s post editor. The difference is that it’s customizable, and thus more powerful. This makes it a lot easier for the user to design content on each page.

wagtail

Magic Mirror for Sketch 3

Heres one for the Sketch users. Basically, it makes a sort of smart object designed to help you put mockups into stock photos.

magic-mirror

WIRE-FRAMING TOOLS

Wire Flow

This one gets my personal stamp of approval. It runs fast on my normally not-drawing-friendly tablet, and comes with just about everything you could ever want from a wire-framing app.

It’s also designed to work with phone-sized devices, which could be a great way to properly visualize a phone app interface.

wireflow

Apple Watch wire-frame kit

Wireframe UI elements for the Apple Watch! What more do you need to know?

apple_watch_wireframe

PowerMockup

There has been more than one wireframe toolkit for Apple’s Keynote software. It was only a matter of time before someone made it happen for Powerpoint. And they have. Here it is.

power-mockup

PROTOTYPING TOOLS

Origami

Coming all the way from Facebook itself: “Origami is a free tool for designing modern user interfaces. Quickly put together a prototype, run it on your iPhone or iPad, iterate on it, and export code snippets your engineers can use.”

No word yet on how useful those code snippets actually are. But it’s Facebook. They have good engineers.

origami

Marvel

With simple tools, and a solid free plan, Marvel makes a great prototyping app. It integrates with Dropbox and Google Drive, importing any images you specify, and allowing you to link them together in a quick mock-up of an app.

It keeps your imported images synced, too. If you save new versions to Dropbox or Google Drive, your prototype app automatically gets updated.

marvel

Protosketch

Protosketch is a prototyping app (kind of) designed for the iPad. It comes with a UI kit (including tons of components), basic vector tools, alignment tools, and a lot more.

It’s currently in beta, and it’s only for the iPad, but if that’s your platform, this could be perfect for you. It plays nice with other apps, too: it can export your files in raster formats, SVG, and PDF.

protosketch

Frontify

Like many other tools on this list, Frontify does prototyping. It also offers tools to make working on branding and style guides as a group easier. Create your color palette, define your style, and create a library of UI elements, and share it with the rest of your team.

frontify

Atomic

Use Atomic to pull in your files from Photoshop or Sketch and make prototypes from them. Version control, collaboration features, and more make this an excellent tool for slick, fast, iterative design.

atomic

Form

Form is an advanced prototype creator that works in tandem with your iPhone. Create the prototype in your desktop or laptop, and see the results immediately on your phone. Plus, it uses Google’s Material Design principles to make your prototype look great.

form

Pixate

Pixate specializes in high-fidelity “native” prototypes that are displayed on your phone and work a lot like the real thing.

pixate

WEB BUILDERS

Sandvox

Sandvox is a Mac app for the non-coders among us. It’s largely template-based (as is an ever-increasing portion of the Internet), but does make provisons for more advanced users to add stuff in manually.

It doubles as a sort of CMS for some kinds of sites, like blogs, and though the software isn’t “new”, recent versions have introduced Sandvox Hosting. The hand-coders among us might recoil at the idea, but for newbies, the package deal is actually pretty great.

It does work with any host, though, so if you want to handle that yourself, you can.

sandvox

XPRS

A site builder for beginners, XPRS offers free sites for personal use, for artists and students. There are pro plans for business and e-commerce.

xprs

WORDPRESS BUILDERS

Themify Flow

WordPress may have its detractors, but others are taking it in surprising new directions. The guys over at Themify, for example, decided that it was time to create a design tool on top of the publishing platform.

The result is Themify Flow which allows you to create custom, responsive WordPress themes from a drag-n-drop interface. Best of all, it’s free and open source.

themifyflow

Cornerstone

Cornerstone is sort of competing with Themify Flow, in that it offers a visual way to create WordPress themes, right on top of WordPress itself.

It operates differenly, however. For example, it features a live code editor, and other features design to give developer-level access to the front-end design. Also, it’s not free, unless you buy the X Theme.

cornerstone

Qards

Quards is another page builder plugin for WordPress. Most of the design work is done for you, but instead of choosing a single template, you build each page with “cards”.

These are basically pre-made layout sections which can be mixed and matched to build a whole page. It’s good for landing pages, arranging individual articles in new and original ways, promo sites, and those sorts of things.

qards

COLLABORATION & PRODUCTIVITY TOOLS

Relay

A quick and easy tool for Slack users who need to share their design work a lot. With extensions/apps for Adobe CC, Sketch, Chrome, and OSX, it simplifies sharing whatever you’re working on.

relay

Skala Preview

Want to see previews of whatever you’re working on in Photoshop or Android? Just installSkala Preview, and you’ll be able to send lossless, color-perfect previews to just about any mobile device.

It comes with the option to plug the device into your computer via USB instead of using wi-fi.

skala_preview

RightFont

RightFont is a fast, pretty font manager for Mac that integrates with Adobe CC and Sketch.

right_font

FRESH CODE

jQuery 3

The jQuery 3 alpha has been released. There aren’t any new features to speak of, but there have been extensive re-writes of old features, bug fixes, and performance improvements.

jquery

Simpler Sidebar

Speaking of jQuery, there are a number of new plugins out that could make a designer’s job a lot easier, especially if you’re a designer who also codes a bit.

We start with Simpler Sidebar, which makes sidebars. It’s small, it’s fast, it’s pretty. Just don’t use a hamburger menu to trigger it, I guess.

simpler-sidebar

Labelauty

Label your radio buttons and check boxes in style. Great for the designer who just can’t let browsers do things their own way.

labelauty

smart-placeholder

When filling out forms, I occasionally click on a field, get distracted by something, and then come back to it. If that field was labeled with a placeholder attribute, I sometimes have to un-select it to remember what I’m supposed to be typing.

Silly, but human.

smartplaceholder solves that design issue by keeping the placeholder visible below the text being typed. Neat, right?

smart-placeholder

REFRESHED TOOLS

We’d be remiss if we didn’t call attention to the great work being done on already well-known apps. Here are the ones that have had some noteworthy updates recently:

Webflow

Webflow has been integrating thirdparty services into its functionality (much like the rest of the Internet) in some new ways. As of now, you can add functionality to your web forms right from Webflow.

You can add e-mails to Mailchimp lists, send out tweets, add data to Google spreadsheets, or make a new note with Evernote. You can also, incidentally, have your form send an e-mail.

webflow

InVision

InVision has been introducing new features steadily, including free, unlimited mobile user testing, a workflow manager, Dribbble integration, and emoji. Yes, emoji.

invision

Strikingly

In recent months, Strikingly has introduced a new page editor, collaboration, and it even added an RSS feed for its blog functionality… Better late than never.

strikingly
web design tools
free web design tools
best web design tools
adobe web design tools
responsive web design tools
web design tools free
opensource web design tools
web design tools for mac
microsoft web design tools
tools for web design
open source web design tools
best tools for web design
web design layout tools
free web design tools for beginners
best wireframe tools for web design
best tools for responsive web design
best free web design tools
top web design tools
google web design tools
web design tools for windows
free web design tools for windows
free wireframe tools for web design
web design tools for beginners
web design tools for ubuntu
free prototyping tools for web design
best free wireframe tools for web design
best tools for web design and coding
best tools for web design commerce site nonprofit
specific skills and tools required for illustrator and web design
tools for a professional web design
simple web design tools for students
django tools for multiplatform web design
tools for web design for divi
the best tools for web design drag and drop
best web design tools for windows
tools for web design to onboarding questionnaire
tools for people who hate web design
web design tools for developers
other tools for teaching web design in the classroom
tools on linux for web design
top web design ui tools for wordpress
web design tools for asp.net
what tools are there for coding and web design
psd tools for web design
best prototyping tools for web design
prototype tools for web design
tools used for responsive web design
tools you need for web design freelance
marketing tools for web design company
tools for web design adobe illustrator
tools for starte of the art web design
web design tools for newbies
useful office tools for web design
web design tools for type
how to use dev tools for front end web design
tools for web design.
best tools for modern web design
free web design tools for studentd
good tools for a web design firm
tools used for web design
web design tools for typeface
what is the most used tools for web design 2017
wireframe tools for web design
web design tools for students
net top 15 web design tools for 2017
popular tools for web design
tools for better web design
best tools for web design and developers
web design tools for freelance
front end and backend tools for web design
online tools for responsive web design
tools needed for a web design company
tools for static site web design
free online tools for responsive web design
web 2.0 tools for web design
best web design tools for freelancers
free embeddable web design tools for text
adobe tools for web design
best tools for web design ecommerce site nonprofit
web design tools for mac images
graphic tools for web design
most usefule tools for web design
web design tools for communities
gogle tools for web design
best design feedback tools for web design
tools needed for web design
web design tools for aws
tools for ui web design
tools for rapid web design ajax
best web design tools for beginners
must have tools for web design
is there a plugin for guide-making tools for web design
tools for responsive web design
tools needed for a web design startup
tools for a web design classroom
best web design tools for ecommerce
• is produced using high tech tools for web design
best sites for web design tools 2016
essential tools for web design
tools for testing responsive web design
best web design tools for writers
free open source tools for web design
ui reporting tools for web design
what tools do we use for a responsive web design
useful web tools for web design
necessary tools for web design
adobe tools training for web design
web design tools for christian sites
wireframe tools for web design free
must-have tools for professional developers web design
top web design tools for designers
online web design tools for teams
what tools to use for web design
best web design tools for mac 2017
tools for rapid web design
best tools for web design 2019
free web design tools for photoshop
software tools for web design
web design tools for bootstrap
dev tools for web design
web design tools for non designers
best tools for web design 2016
google tools for web design
free online tools for web design
mobile tools for web design
gui tools for web design
best web design for tools
simple tools for web design
design tools for web design
latest tools for web design
advanced tools for web design
easy tools for web design
tools for web design 2018
what are the best tools for web design
tools for learning web design
what tools for web design
prototyping tools for web design
mapping tools for web design
web design tools for html5
multimedia tools for web design
tools for web design ui
best web tools for web design
what are the tools needed for web design
professional tools for web design
5 tools for web design
tools for modern web design
basic tools for web design
innovative tools for web design
tools for web design process
workflow tools for web design
web editing tools for web design
ps tools for web design
free tools for web design
free tools for responsive web design
visual tools for web design
free web design tools for mac
download tools for web design
web design for online tools
best tools for web design 2017
colour tools for web design
open source tools for web design
web design tools free for mac
tools for web design tutorial
coding tools for web design
best web design tools for designers
web design tools for free
online tools for web design
best animation tools for web design
mac tools for web design
usability tools for web design
web design tools for free download
adobe tools for responsive web design
web design tools for 2017
web design tools for websites
web design tools for js
tools for creating web design
ux tools for web design
tools for web design software
excellent tools for creating web design wireframes
tools required for web design
free tools for creating web design wireframes
ui tools for web design
good tools for web design
new tools for web design and development
web design tools for photoshop
microsoft tools for web design
in design tools for web design
web design tools for collaboration
web design apps
web design apps for mac
apps web design
best web design apps
free web design apps
web design apps for ipad 2012
iphone web design apps
best web design ipad apps
adobe web design apps
mac apps web design
web design apps for windows
web design apps for android
web design ipad apps
web design apps iphone
linux web design apps
web design apps win 10 2019
adobe apps for web design
html web design apps
mac web design apps
web design apps and extensions
best apps to learn web design
web design software apps
wolf web design apps for mac
web design – apps that have no purpose
best web design apps for mac
andrew lincoln web design and apps
best apps for photoshop integration web design
business apps web design
drag and drop web design apps for windows
best web design apps for ubuntu
web design and mobite apps business opportunity
good windows 10 apps for web design
adobe apps needed for web design
mark andrews web design and apps llc
web design apps made by adobe
web design computer apps
prototyping apps for web design
web design language for web apps apps
andrew watson web design and apps
how mobile apps have changed web design
comparing the best web design apps
apps for running my web design company
best apps to use for web design
web design apps for mac 2017
top ten web design apps
chromebook web design apps
web design apps for ipad
free web design apps for macbook pro
online apps to test mobile web design
comp apps 2 sms web design
best apps for writing web design
web design language for apps
web design and apps llc 3901 kenwood place orlando, florida
best apps for web design
windows apps free pictures graphics for web design
responsive web design versus mobile apps
web design apps for macbook pro
best android web design apps
best apps to help web design
apps for web design
9. web design apps
web design mockup apps
web design style apps
apps web design shopify
are progressive web apps teh same as responsive web design
best apps for web design mac
web design learning apps
cpanel web design apps
paradigm digital – web design, web apps, mobile apps – memphis 89 n. cooper st memphis
tracy apps web design
mark andrews owner, web design and apps llc
web design apps andrew russell
web design and apps
amazing web design apps
easy mood board apps for web design
web design tools software apps
is responsive web design for native or web apps
selling web design mobile apps
google apps web design
google apps web design tools
top 10 protyping apps web design
free color apps web design
web design agency apps for clients
web design review roundup: our favorite mac apps for building a website
web design apps for apple
best program for design material apps web design
web design educatino apps
best free web design apps
mood board apps for web design
web design and apps llc
top windows 10 web design apps
essental web design apps ipad
web design apps for marketing
web design apps app store
best web design apps for windows
web design in mobile apps
web design using apps
macbook apps for web design
pro creations – web design apps development seo company nagpur
web design apps top
web design apps for android tablet
best mac apps for web design
responsive web design apps
professional web design apps
essential web design apps
web design portable apps
web design apps ipad
chrisans web design & mobile apps development company kuwait kuwait city kuwait
linux apps for web design
web design apps templates
web design apps on mac
web design web apps
best web design online apps
web design google apps
web design apps for ubuntu
top web design apps
best web design apps 2015
best web design apps 2017
web design apps on android
web design apps mac os x
web design apps template
reflect on web design vs. mobile apps
free web design apps for mac
good web design apps
apps needed for web design
chrisans web design & mobile apps development company kuwait
web design apps ipad pro
web design apps for macbook
mac os x web design apps
apps on web design
web design apps example
apps for learning web design
apps used for web design
web design workflow apps
web design project apps
best responsive web design apps
web design apps for imac
web design tool apps
web design vs. mobile apps
web design apps windows
web design mobile apps
must have web design apps
web design popular apps
web design apps graphics
web design services apps
web design apps for windows 10
best mac web design apps for beginners
web design companies mobile apps
web design apps android
top 10 web design apps
top web design apps 2015
web design apps download
web design apps for ios
web design apps for iphone
web design apps for ipad 2
best apps for web design ipad
top web design apps for mac
web design apps ios
free web design apps for ipad
freelance web design apps
web design apps for linux
new apps for web design
web design apps list
simple web design apps
web design apps free
apple web design apps
apps for web design on ipad
zinavo-web design /mobile apps development company in bangalore
web design london apps
mac apps for web design
web design apps for ipad pro
zinavo-web design /mobile apps development company in bangalore bengaluru karnataka
mobile apps for web design
web design apps 2018
What is a Favicon, and How To Make a Favicon in Photoshop?

What is a Favicon, and How To Make a Favicon in Photoshop?

What is a Favicon

A favicon is a small 16×16 pixel icon that appears at the top of a web browser. It serves as branding for your website and a convenient way for visitors to locate your page when they have multiple tabs open. Because of their tiny size, favicons work best as simple images or one-to-three characters of text.

what is a favicon

Example of favicons on a desktop browser (above).

To get a favicon for your website, you could hire a freelance designer to create one based on your logo and brand colors, or (we would highly recommend) create the favicon yourself.

Technical Definition of Favicon:

favicon /ˈfæv.ɪˌkɒn/ (short for favorite icon), also known as a shortcut iconwebsite icontab iconURL icon, or bookmark icon, is a file containing one or more small icons, associated with a particular website or web page. A web designer can create such an icon and upload it to a website (or web page) by several means, and graphical web browsers will then make use of it. Browsers that provide favicon support typically display a page’s favicon in the browser’s address bar (sometimes in the history as well) and next to the page’s name in a list of bookmarks. Browsers that support a tabbed document interface typically show a page’s favicon next to the page’s title on the tab, and site-specific browsers use the favicon as a desktop icon.

Favicons can also be used to have a textless favorite site, saving space.

History of Favicon:

In March 1999, Microsoft released Internet Explorer 5, which supported favicons for the first time. Originally, the favicon was a file called favicon.ico placed in the root directory of a website. It was used in Internet Explorer’s favorites (bookmarks) and next to the URL in the address bar if the page was bookmarked. A side effect was that the number of visitors who had bookmarked the page could be estimated by the requests of the favicon. This side effect no longer works, as all modern browsers load the favicon file to display in their web address bar, regardless of whether the site is bookmarked.

Favicon Sizes and Formats

16×16 pixels is the standard size used by desktop website browsers. However, many website builders will ask for larger sizes. For example, WordPress requires 512×512 pixels and Squarespace asks for 300×300 pixels.

This is because favicons are not only used in browser bars. They are also displayed when a user bookmarks a site or saves a shortcut to their desktop or mobile home screen. In these cases, the size of the icon grows much larger.

what is a favicon

Example of favicons on a smartphone home screen. These icons are significantly larger than the desktop favicons pictured further above.

To be safe, try to upload whatever image size is requested by your website builder. Again, for WordPress, this is 512×512 pixels. WordPress will automatically resize and display the proper image for each scenario, so you don’t have to worry about resizing them yourself.

The standard file format for favicons is .ico but most website platforms will also accept .png files.

How to Make a Favicon in Photoshop

The majority of websites we create is via WordPress (site icon), so we simply need to create a 512px x 512px (icon) png. We personally prefer using Photoshop to create favicons. Even if you have limited graphic design experience you should not be overwhelmed by any means by this “project”.

If you don’t have the latest version of Photoshop, here’s the official Adobe link:

Latest version of Photoshop

1. Create a blank 512px x 512px canvas (working area).

2. Create a basic icon via combining basic geometric shapes with a shape tool or even simply large letters with a text tool.

What is a favicon and how do you make a favicon?
What is a favicon and how do you make a favicon?

Optional: We personally prefer a favicon w/o a background, so if using photoshop unlock the background layer and delete it which will create a transparent background.

3. Save the image as a 512px x 512px png file.

Congrats you’ve now created a favicon! It’s that easy!

Now you can share this knowledge/skill to anyone else asking “What is a Favicon?… How Do You Make a Favicon?”


Other graphic design related products & content that could help:

photoshop save as png
how to make a transparent background in illustrator
how to save as png in photoshop
photoshop icon png
create favicon photoshop
favicon.cc
how to save png in photoshop
save photoshop as png
saving icon
can’t save as png photoshop
how to make a favicon in photoshop
favicon photoshop
save as png in photoshop
how to save a png in photoshop
photoshop favicon
how to save photoshop as png
photoshop cant save as png
photoshop ppi
how to create a template in photoshop
website icon transparent background
how to open ico file
how to create a favicon in photoshop
create favicon in photoshop
how to save a photoshop file as a png
favicon doesn’t show up
drone favicon
turn off anti aliasing photoshop
photoshop export html
photoshop not saving png
save as png photoshop
open ico files
save png in photoshop
photoshop cs6 save as png
how to turn off anti aliasing in photoshop
how to open.ico files
make a favicon in photoshop
favicon illustrator
opening ico files
adobe photoshop icon png
how to open ico files
favicon size wix
why can’t i save as png in photoshop
create a favicon in photoshop
tree favicon
photoshop icon file
can’t save as png in photoshop cc
opening.ico files
open ico file
how to save a logo in illustrator with transparent background
how to save an illustrator file with a transparent background
how to edit png in photoshop
paw favicon
why can’t i save a png in photoshop
photoshop cc 2015 save for web
save png photoshop
favicon in photoshop
illustrator how to save as png
make favicon photoshop
save illustrator with transparent background
blur ico
photoshop wont save as png
favicon popup
photoshop save as mp4
how to make favicon photoshop
remove favicons
remove favicon
creating a favicon in photoshop
why can’t i save as png in photoshop cc
saving png in photoshop
how to create a photoshop template
photography favicon
photoshop create favicon
cant save as png in photoshop
illustrator favicon
how to save in png in photoshop
why can’t i save as a png in photoshop
cant save as png
photoshop file icon
change mp4 icon
how to make favicon in photoshop
saving as png in photoshop
psd file icon
how to create a favicon in illustrator
how to create favicon in photoshop
export ico from photoshop
open ico in photoshop
film favicon
hard drive ico
ebay favicon
how to create favicon photoshop
convert pdf to ico
photoshop cs6 png
how to make a favicon in photoshop cc
making a favicon in photoshop
psd to ico
key favicon
how to open an ico file
love favicon
illustrator save as ico
ico open
convert ico to gif
upload ico
dollar sign favicon
convert png to ps
photoshop cc png
animated ico
dreamweaver favicon
create .ico file photoshop

  •  Firefox only accepts favicon.ico in the website’s root without a <link> tag if the setting browser.chrome.favicons or browser.chrome.site_icons is set to true in about:config. The default value is true. If set to false, these favicons are ignored.
  • ^ Opera loads /favicon.ico only if Multimedia/Always load favicon option in opera:config is set to 1. See Opera Support page for more details.

If links for both PNG and ICO favicons are present, PNG-favicon-compatible browsers select which format and size to use as follows. Firefox and Safari will use the favicon that comes last. Chrome for Mac will use whichever favicon is ICO formatted, otherwise the 32×32 favicon. Chrome for Windows will use the favicon that comes first if it is 16×16, otherwise the ICO. If none of the aforementioned options are available, both Chromes will use whichever favicon comes first, exactly the opposite of Firefox and Safari. Indeed, Chrome for Mac will ignore the 16×16 favicon and use the 32×32 version, only to scale it back down to 16×16 on non-retina devices. Opera will choose from any of the available icons completely at random.[37]

Only SeaMonkey doesn’t fetch favicon.ico files in the website’s root by default.[38]

Device support

The recommended basic size for this icon is 152×152 pixels. For Apple devices with the iOS operating system version 1.1.3 or later, as well as some Android devices,[39] it is possible to provide a custom icon that users can display on their home screens by using theAdd to Home Screen button within the share sheet in Safari.[40][41] This feature is enabled by supplying a <link rel="apple-touch-icon" ...> in the <head> section of documents served by the website. If the custom icon is not provided, a thumbnail of the web page will be put on the home screen instead.[42]

For the iPad, the basic size is 180×180 pixels. Android tablets [via Chrome] prefer a 192×192 PNG icon.[44]

The icon file referenced by apple-touch-icon is modified to add rounded corners. On the iOS versions prior to iOS 7, a drop shadow, and reflective shine would be added, and apple-touch-icon-precomposed icon may be provided to instruct devices not to apply reflective shine on the image.[41][42]

With rounded corners, added by iOS
<link rel="apple-touch-icon" href="https://example.com/image.png">

No HTML is required by browsers or mobile devices to retrieve these icons, either.[42] The website’s root is the default location for the file apple-touch-icon.png (in order of priority).[41][42]

HTML5 recommendation for icons in multiple sizes[edit]

The current HTML5 specification recommends specifying multiple sizes for the icons, using the attributes rel="icon" sizes="space-separated list of icon dimensions" within a <link> tag.[45] Multiple icon formats, including container formats such as Microsoft .ico and Macintosh .icns files, as well as Scalable Vector Graphics may be provided by including the icon’s content type in the format type="file content-type" within the <link> tag.

As of iOS 5, Apple mobile devices ignore the HTML5 recommendation and instead use the proprietary apple-touch-icon method detailed above. The Google Chrome web browser however, will select the closest matching size from those provided in the HTML headers to create 128×128 pixel application icons, when the user chooses the Create application shortcuts… from the “Tools” menu.

Animated favicons[edit]

Various browsers such as Chrome, Firefox and Opera support animation of favicons. A bug report has been open for Firefox since 2001 requesting a way to disable the feature.[46][47]

Limitations and criticism[edit]

Due to the need to always check for it in a fixed location, the favicon can lead to artificially slow page-load time and unnecessary 404 entries in the server log if it is nonexistent.[6]

The W3C did not standardize the rel-attribute, so there are other keywords such as shortcut icon that are also accepted by the user agent.[11][24]

Favicons are often manipulated as part of phishing or eavesdropping attacks against HTTPS webpages. Many web browsers display favicons near areas of the web browser’s UI, such as the address bar, that are used to convey whether the connection to a website is using a secure protocol like TLS. By changing the favicon to a familiar padlock image an attacker can attempt to trick the user into thinking they are securely connected to the proper website. Automated man-in-the-middle attack tools such as SSLStrip utilize this trick.[48] In order to eliminate this, some web browsers display the favicon within the tab whilst displaying the security status of the protocol used to access the website beside the URL.[49]

Since favicons are usually located at the root of the site directory on the server, they can be employed with some reliability to disclose whether a web client is logged into a given service. This works by making use of the redirect-after-login feature of many websites, by querying for the favicon in a redirect-after-login URL and testing the server response to discern whether the user is given the requested resource (which means they are logged in), or instead redirected to the login page (which means that they aren’t logged into the service).[50]

In March 1999, Microsoft released Internet Explorer 5, which supported favicons for the first time.[4] Originally, the favicon was a file called favicon.ico placed in the root directory of a website. It was used in Internet Explorer‘s favorites (bookmarks) and next to the URL in the address bar if the page was bookmarked.[5][6][7][4] A side effect was that the number of visitors who had bookmarked the page could be estimated by the requests of the favicon. This side effect no longer works, as all modern browsers load the favicon file to display in their web address bar, regardless of whether the site is bookmarked.[6]

Standardization[edit]

The favicon was standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in the HTML 4.01 recommendation, released in December 1999, and later in the XHTML 1.0 recommendation, released in January 2000.[8][9] The standard implementation uses a link element with a rel attribute in the <head> section of the document to specify the file format and file name and location. Unlike in the prior scheme, the file can be in any Web site directory and have any image file format.[10][11]

In 2003, the .ico format was registered by a third party with the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) under the MIME type image/vnd.microsoft.icon.[12][13] However, when using the .ico format to display as images (e.g. not as favicon), Internet Explorer cannot display files served with this standardized MIME type.[13] A workaround for Internet Explorer is to associate .ico with the non-standard image/x-icon MIME type in Web servers.[14]

RFC 5988 established an IANA link relation registry,[15] and rel="icon" was registered in 2010 based on the HTML5 specification. The popular <link rel="shortcut icon" type="image/png" href="image/favicon.png"> theoretically identifies two relations, “shortcut” and “icon“, but “shortcut” is not registered and is redundant. In 2011 the HTML living standard[16] specified that for historical reasons “shortcut” is allowed immediately before “icon“;[17] however, “shortcut” does not have a meaning in this context.

Legacy[edit]

Internet Explorer 5–10 supports only the ICO file formatNetscape 7 and Internet Explorer versions 5 and 6 display the favicon only when the page is bookmarked, and not simply when the pages are visited as in later browsers.[4]

favicon /ˈfæv.ɪˌkɒn/ (short for favorite icon), also known as a shortcut iconwebsite icontab iconURL icon, or bookmark icon, is a file containing one or more small icons,[1] associated with a particular website or web page.[1][2] A web designer can create such an icon and upload it to a website (or web page) by several means, and graphical web browsers will then make use of it.[3] Browsers that provide favicon support typically display a page’s favicon in the browser’s address bar (sometimes in the history as well) and next to the page’s name in a list of bookmarks.[3] Browsers that support a tabbed document interface typically show a page’s favicon next to the page’s title on the tab, and site-specific browsers use the favicon as a desktop icon.[1]

Favicons can also be used to have a textless favorite site, saving space.

How to Obtain Website Content from Clients

How to Obtain Website Content from Clients

Content from Clients

In a perfect world, we’d all have all the content we needed before we ever touched a wireframe, on paper or otherwise. The hate for lorem ipsum is real, and I do understand why, but it’s a simple fact that we do not live in a perfect world. Clients are often ready to hand over a down payment, but not actually ready to build the site yet.

If you find yourself in this situation (and it will happen a lot at the beginning of your career), you’ll need to help your client get ready. And if they don’t hire a copy writer, you’ll need to help them write the content themselves.

Note: Even though this guide is directed towards web design, the experiences and principles can be applied to virtually any project (in any industry) that involves procuring content from a client.

Give Them Constraints

If your client is writing their own content, they may need to be told what to write. Most people are not writers by nature. It’s a skill that can be learned by virtually anyone with varying levels of success, but it takes some persistence and associated time. Most people, when told to write some content for a website, are probably going to stare at the blank screen for a while.

Hesitantly they might begin to pluck out letters on their keyboard, one by one. It’ll probably be a laborious process, but they’ll have that first grand sentence: “Hi! Welcome to the home page of our website.” And then they might write a bunch of stuff that would probably be better suited for another page.

People have long made the argument that total creative freedom doesn’t make for good design; constraints do. Constraints force us to solve problems, but they also give us direction, and purpose. Yes, it means doing some of their website planning and strategy for them, but no one said you had to do it for free.

Go Through The Process With Them Before They Write

Even instructions like, “Okay, you need a paragraph of introductory text for the home page.” might be a bit vague for people unfamiliar with writing website copy. Get on Skype, or even meet them in person to take your client through the plan you have for their website (wireframes or other prototypes may come in handy here).

Also be sure to tell them how much content is intended for each page, page section, or UI element. If only a sentence or two will reasonably fit, make sure they know this. If they can go nuts on the “About Us” page, make sure they know that, too.

And yes, giving them a space to go nuts is probably a good idea. Everyone wants unleash their inner Hemingway, and if the “About” page ends up being as long and annoying as The Old Man and the Sea, that’s the price we pay for good relationships with our clients.

As you go through your instructions, write them down, and send them to your client via email for reference. This way, they’ll always know what the plan is.

Charge by the hour for this bit, at least.

Go Ahead And Annoy Them A Bit

Ever had a client give you a deadline, then disappear? You have no obligation to take that lying down. Now, they might be busy, and have other legitimate priorities. If they tell you a family member is sick, just work for another client for a while.

But if they just disappear on you, don’t be afraid to remind them once in a while. They might genuinely forget, and need the reminder. Even if they haven’t forgotten, they might need a little motivation. And yes, you might annoy them a bit, but clients should respect your time, too.

If they can’t finish even one project, there probably isn’t a long-term relationship on the table

Now don’t e-mail them every day. That’s excessive. An e-mail per week should be fine to start with, and you can always increase that number as deadlines approach. If they e-mail you back with something like, “Thanks, I’m working on it!”, or, “For god’s sake please stop, I’m working on it!”… you can safely stop sending them e-mails for a while.

Don’t worry too much about annoying them. If they can’t finish even one project, there probably isn’t a long-term relationship on the table.

Use Software To Make It All A Bit Easier

Of course, this is all a fair bit of work. You can automate the process of getting content from your clients just a little bit, though. If you’ve got the budget for one more darned SAAS product in your pipeline, you could try out Content Snare.

You literally just set up forms that specifically request the content you need. You can put in character limits, and basically define the information required with various kinds of inputs. You want constraints? They’ve got constraints, and automatic email reminders.

Now the downside to this software is the cost. At the time of this writing, the cheapest plan is $24US per month (billed yearly). It’s affordable, probably, for a designer with plenty of clients already. But when every dollar counts, this is one tool you can probably do without.

For anyone who’s a little cash-strapped, you can replicate the basic functionality for requesting content with a much simpler tool like Google Forms. Just make one for each page, and go. You can embed these forms, too, so if you already have something like a “client area” set up on your website, you could theoretically set each client up with their own set of forms to fill out, all in one place.

Automated reminder emails? Well, there’s no shortage of mass mailing applications out there. If you’re already using one, you could schedule some reminders pretty easily. Just be sure to turn them off once you’ve gotten a response.

Annoying them is one thing. Using robots to do it is another.

Provide Some Examples from Relevant Sources

A simple and effective way to get a client to understand fully what you want them to provide is to give them pertinent and specific examples of the needed content. For example if the client’s project is a construction website that specifically needs some text content for the Services page you could send them a url of a well established construction website’s a Service’s page and inform them to create something similar. It really can be that easy. Of course this method could be replicated throughout the site as needed.

Offboard Web Design Project in 5 Steps: How to Guide

Offboard Web Design Project in 5 Steps: How to Guide

Offboard Web Design Project – 5 Steps

As you draw closer to the finish line with a website, does your client see it just as clearly as you do? Or are they still wavering on design and copy choices even while you’re in the final stages of QA, or talking about additional features they’ll want to add to the site “some day”? It’s time to offboard web design project.

Unless you are getting paid — and paid well — for every single hour you put into a website, you have to be willing to enforce a final stopping point. If you don’t, your client will undoubtedly play the “What about this? Or this?” game for as long as you allow them to.

And you can’t afford to do that. You have other clients whose websites deserve your attention.

Just as you have created an onboarding process to smoothly kick off a new website project, you must do the same with an offboarding process.

Step 1: Collect Your Final Payment

Once the client has given you the approval on the finished website, you push it live. After some light testing to confirm that all is well on the live domain, it’s time to initiate the offboarding process.

You’ll do this by sending along the last invoice. Better yet, your invoicing software should automatically be configured to do this upon reaching the final project milestone.

One my favorite tools to do this with is AND CO.

AND CO

That’s because you can do everything in here:

  • Create a proposal;
  • Send the contract;
  • Track your time;
  • Send invoices.

Because each of these elements exist within the same place, setting up and scheduling invoices based on your project’s milestones (including the launch date) is really easy to do.

Don’t move on to the next steps until you collect the payment due though. Letting a client go any more than seven days after the project’s end without final payment simply invites them to ask you to do more work.

Step 2: Send the Wrap-up Email

Upon confirming receipt of payment, send your client a wrap-up email.

This doesn’t have to be lengthy. The goal is to get them to schedule the closing call as soon as possible. Something like this should work:

Greetings, [client name]!
I wanted to thank you for the opportunity to build this website for [company name]. I hope you’re just as pleased with it as I am!
I know you’re excited to put this website to work for you now that you have it, but I have just a few things I want to show you as we wrap up.
When you have a moment, please go to my Calendly and schedule a 15-minute Wrap-Up Session for some time this week. 
During this call, I’ll give you a behind-the-scenes tour of your website and show you how to edit your content. Afterwards, I will send along the login credentials you need to manage your website along with all of your design assets.
Talk soon.

As I mentioned in the message above, Calendly is the tool I use to simplify my scheduling with clients.

Calendly

All you have to do is create an event (like “Client Offboarding” or “Client Onboarding”), set up your availability, and then send the link to your clients to pick a time when you’re free. It makes life so much easier.

Step 3: Do the Wrap-Up Video Call

This final call with your client needs to be done over video or, at the very least, a screen-share. For this, I’d suggest using Zoom.

Zoom

The above example is how I used to do my offboarding calls with WordPress clients.

I’d log into their website and then give them an orientation of all of the key areas they needed to know. I’d show them how to create a post, how to create a page, and explain the difference between the two. I’d also show them important areas like the Media folder, the area to manage Users, and maybe a few other things.

This “training” call is yours to do with as you like. Just make sure the client walks away feeling confident in taking the reins over from you.

Step 4: Deliver the Remaining Pieces

The website is done, you’ve collected the payment, and you’ve had the final call with your client. Now, it’s time to deliver the remaining pieces you owe them.

Logins – If you created any accounts from-scratch (e.g. WordPress, web hosting, social media, etc.), send along the login credentials.

Style guide – Did you create a style guide for the client? Package it up in a professional-looking PDF and send it over in case they decide to work with another designer in the future.

Design assets – Again, on the off chance they work with someone else, you’ll want to send along the design assets you created in their native formats.

Licenses – You may have licensed certain assets during this project, like stock photos or design templates. If that’s the case, you’ll need to bill them for the licenses (if you haven’t already) and transfer ownership to them now.

While you could send these along before the wrap-up call, you run the risk of the clients taking the materials and running away… Only to show up months later wanting to know what all this stuff is, what they’re supposed to do with it, and wondering if you’ll have time to walk them through the website now.

Or they don’t open any of it and then message you months down the line, urgently demanding access to their site, files, etc. To avoid this from happening, clearly label everything and send it along in a shared Dropbox folder.

Dropbox

Even if they lose the link to the Dropbox folder at any point, you don’t have to repackage up all their stuff again. You can simply grab the link from your end and resend.

Step 5: Follow Up in 60 Days

Set a reminder in your project management template to follow up with website clients 60 days after the wrap-up. This will give them enough time to sit with the website and either:

  • Become really comfortable using it;
  • Realize it’s too much work.

Either way, it’s a good idea to check in.

If they’re taking good care of the website and using it to promote their business, that’s great. This email will simply serve as a reminder that you remain their trusted ally and you’re here if they ever need anything.

And if they’re not taking care of it, this is an excellent opportunity to offer your assistance in providing (paid) support and maintenance.

Bringing Projects to a Close with an Offboarding Process

If you’ve done a good job of setting expectations with your client from the start, bringing a project to a close should be no problem.

Then again, you know how clients can get. They’re so excited to actually have a website now that they can’t stop imagining the possibilities. So long as you’ve delivered what they paid for, though, you are under no obligation to keep this project open to entertain those ideas unless they start a new contract with you.

Use this offboarding checklist to ensure you give each of your web design projects as strong and final a close as possible.

Combine the Power of Data and Design to Maximize Results For Your Website

Combine the Power of Data and Design to Maximize Results For Your Website

In today’s digital era, having an impactful and compelling website is a critical component for any business or organization. A useful site that connects with your audience instills trust, screams authority, and drives action, can mean the difference between remaining relevant and competitive or falling silently to the wayside.

Despite the critical importance of websites in today’s competitive landscape, many web designers find their creations falling short on the performance matrix, under-delivering on KPIs and leaving those in charge scratching their heads for an answer.

Simply put, sometimes innovative layouts and stunning visuals aren’t enough. Lack of data in the design process can create a disconnect between what “works” and what looks or feels appealing.

The marriage of data and design makes for a compelling approach to data-driven design processes and can act as a guiding force for strategizing and implementing site architecture and design elements that not only look great but meet or exceed performance expectations.

Market Research – Where it all Begins

In life, as in business (and web design), having a clear direction and goal in mind from the outset will make for a predictable journey to that end.

If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable

~ Seneca

Market research is all about understanding your audience, analyzing the competition and competitive landscape, and looking introspectively inward to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.

MARKET DEMANDS

Your “market” represents the gameboard, along with all of its components and pieces upon which your design strategy executes. As it relates to market demands, what elements are vital, required or expected of your design and website?

Examples:

  • Visible accreditations or licensure;
  • Prominent reviews and ratings;
  • Specific contact or support channels;
  • Information such as guides or training materials;
  • Product/service visuals or demonstrations;
  • Transparent pricing.

Market demands vary and will be particular to your specific industry, geographic location, and other factors.

COMPETITION / COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE

You know what they say: Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. While you don’t need to become best friends with the competition, monitoring their activities, strategies, updates, offerings and other prerogatives can provide you with insightful and useful information.

Competitive data can be used to leverage the time, resources and hard work of other brands to identify those activities or strategies that either perform well or fail in the market.

By doing so, you can learn from costly mistakes, while benefiting from winning concepts already battle-tested in the market and proven to either work.

Further, understanding the competitive landscape in its totality will help you understand what you’re up against, and can help you formulate ways to uniquely position your design in the market such that it stands out among the sea of competitors vying for the same business.

TARGET AUDIENCE / CUSTOMER AVATAR

Without a deep understanding of your target audience, any web designer is prone to missing the mark badly, failing to connect with, engage, inspire action, and meet the needs of their visitors.

Considerations with regards to your audience should include both demographic and user behavior data.

Demographic Data to Consider:

  • Gender
  • Age brackets
  • Income
  • Geographic locations
  • Family size
  • And other relevant data
  • Behavioral Data to Consider:
  • Needs and wants
  • Pain points or complaints
  • Issues/problems
  • Desired solutions
  • Likes and preferences
  • Purchase habits
  • And more…

The specific types of behavioral and demographic data that will be most useful and relevant to your design will be mostly dependent on your brand, vertical/niche, offerings, and other particulars.

PRODUCT / SOLUTIONS AUDIT

Sometimes it’s hard to see the forest for the trees as it were. Taking a step back and assessing your product/solutions and other offers can provide perspective on necessary design elements, positioning, and framing that can help turn a non-performing offer into a critical source of revenue.

Utilizing information uncovered in the previous steps, cross-reference your offers and take a hard look at whether or not your products or services meet market and user demands, needs and want.

In what way do your offers stand out (or in what ways can you make them stand out) from those offered by the competition. Utilize this data to formulation unique positioning and strategic approaches to incorporate your offers’ USP or value proposition.

Keyword Research

Keyword research is a vital component of the design process, and will largely dictate how information is architected, organized, presented and delivered on the site.

Approach keyword research from a bottom-up or top-down funnel approach.

Necessary components of keyword research include:

  • Keyword competition;
  • Keyword intent (buyer vs. research vs. informational, etc.);
  • Stage of funnel each keyword targets;
  • Organization of content for search engines and user experience;
  • Link modeling for internal link and ranking strategies.

Types of Content May Include:

  • Sales/landing pages;
  • Service/product pages;
  • Resources, guides, tutorials;
  • Informational and supportive blog posts or articles;
  • Information Architecture.

Information architecture is essential for user experience, search engine optimization, and conversion rate optimization. Utilizing data from the previous market and keyword research phases you can begin to optimally architect information in a way that is conducive to better performance.

ELEMENTS TO INCORPORATE INTO YOUR DESIGN ARCHITECTURE

Site Structure: Determined by both market and keyword research, your site’s structure can be first mapped out by using an organizational chart for ease of visualization.

URL Mapping: This step, while mostly administrative and somewhat tedious, involves the creation of each URL structure optimized for both readability by users and optimized for search engines to understand. Once created, assign designated keywords to their respective URLs.

Page Flows: An understanding of user behavior and the ideal buyer journey should also shape how information is structured and organized, helping both users and search engines to “flow” seamlessly through information in a way that answers their questions and solves their problems with the least amount of “friction.”

Value Propositions: An understanding of the problems and pain points facing your target audience will enable you to architect, draft and present unique value propositions tailored to each individualized problem or issue.

Topic Clustering: Once you’ve mapped out your keywords, pages, and content, group or “cluster” those topics that are semantically relevant to each other. Clustering your content can help with search engine categorization and relevancy metrics.

Interlinking: Once mapped out with pages and content clustered, seek out opportunities to link between related pages.

Closing Thoughts

Tailoring design to user needs and expectations is never far from any designer’s thought process, yet knowing exactly which strategies or tactics have the best chance of performing well is often unclear. By utilizing a data-driven decision-making process, web designers can leverage information in a way that helps them formulate a plan tailor-made to perform and exceed expectations. Designs using data versus personal opinion, experience improved levels of engagement, higher conversions, enhanced user experience and overall performance.

As a professional web designer, you have a responsibility to both the users, and to the organization for which you are working, to use and implement all available tools to deliver the best end product possible. Data is one of those tools and one in which there is an excellent potential for success when used correctly.

references: canva, webdesignerdepot, klipfolio